Tigers 101 | National Geographic

History
Tigers are icons of beauty, power, and the importance of conservation. Learn five surprising facts about these striped felines, including how large the cats can be, an adaptation some developed for swimming, and how much wild tiger populations have declined.

Notes of a native son: the world according to James Baldwin - Christina Greer

History
James Baldwin was an American novelist and social critic whose essays in “Notes of a Native Son” explored race, sex and class distinctions.

Are You Capable of Murder?

History
The Ted Bundy Tapes had us wonder what it takes to be a killer.

The Border Between Crocs and Humans | Explorer

History
Thanks to an aggressive conservation effort in the Northern Territory of Australia, crocodiles now outnumber people. But as humans push their boundaries, the crocs push back.

Could You Survive In The Middle Ages?

History
We explore just how difficult life was back in the Middle Ages!

How one journalist risked her life to hold murderers accountable

History
Ida B. Wells was an investigative journalist, civil rights leader, and anti-lynching advocate who fought for equality and justice.

Spinning Black Holes

History
A pulsing black hole in the centre of a distant galaxy sheds light on black hole and galaxy formation. How fast are black holes rotating and how does that rotation change over its life-span?

The Most Important Dinosaur

History
Dinosaurs!

A brie(f) history of cheese - Paul Kindstedt

History
Before empires and royalty, before pottery and writing, before metal tools and weapons – there was cheese. As early as 8000 BCE, Neolithic farmers began a legacy of cheesemaking almost as old as civilization.

The Bird Poop That Changed The World

History
Thanks to my grandmother for inspiring this story, and to my mother for helping make it. If you like our videos, please consider supporting MinuteEarth on Patreon!

This Is Why The Holidays Can Suck!

History
Trying to be cheery might make you dreary!

Holiday Butter Cookies As Made By Kelsey Impicciche

History
Holiday family time becomes even sweeter when you make these super soft butter cookies together!

These Names Can Kill Animals

History
Just like the names of products and companies, animals' names can affect how we feel about them...and changing the name of a species might actually help us save it.

Why Are Fewer People Getting Appendicitis?

History
There are many other unforeseen health changes that seem to be related to the forces of modernization, like the increase in rates of diabetes, Crohn’s disease, and ADHD.

Who decides what art means?

History
There is a question that has been tossed around by philosophers and art critics for decades: how much should an artist's intention affect your interpretation of the work?

Five Firsts for Mars InSight

History
Mars InSight will be the first to detect seismic activity on Mars’ surface, first to measure rate of heat transmitted from interior, first to dig nearly 5m down, first to measure magnetic fields on Mars’ surface, and first to use a robotic arm to place instruments on the surface of Mars (assuming it lands of course…)

The Dinosaur On Your Thanksgiving Table

History
Eating turkey this holiday season? Chowing down on a roast chicken? You’re eating a dinosaur!

Why is meningitis so dangerous?

History
In 1987, thousands of people gathered in Saudi Arabia for the annual Hajj pilgrimage. But what started out as a celebration led to a worldwide health crisis: more than 2,000 cases of meningitis broke out, spreading across Saudi Arabia and the rest of the world.

Caffeine 101 | National Geographic

History
Nearly 90% of the United States population has at least one caffeinated beverage every day. Learn about the chemistry of caffeine, how it causes increased alertness and focus, and how caffeine is capable of causing overdoses.

The myth of Sisyphus - Alex Gendler

History
Sisyphus was both a clever ruler who made his city prosperous and a devious tyrant who seduced his niece and killed visitors to show off his power.

Ancient Mesopotamia 101 | National Geographic

History
Ancient Mesopotamia proved that fertile land and the knowledge to cultivate it was a fortuitous recipe for wealth and civilization.